When Porsche began developing an electric car it was putting a lot on the line. How does a company with the reputation for building, selling, and racing  some of the fastest and most exciting cars on the road get into the electric car game? By focusing on every part of the car, as they have for every car before.

We assumed the steering would be good. Porsche is known for the superiority of their PDK transmission and electric power steering (EPS) over competitors. The PDK shifts in a blink. It's somehow seamless but tactile. Their EPS has the most road feel of any available. Porsche pays attention to everything the driver touches or interacts with. The Taycan is no different. It's steering is quick and communicative. The interior looks on-brand with a dash of the future thrown in. Instead of their traditional 5 round gauges there's a curved display. In the center are two tablets. The rest of it is up to Porsche's quality standards, looking and feeling a bit nicer than the competitor's.

What about straight-line performance? Acceleration is practically a natural component of an electric car. With full torque available from 0 RPM they all feel a bit quick compared to a gas-burner. Even a BMW i3 feels quick. Dizzying acceleration is basically required of an EV at this price point. To stand out Porsche developed a battery and motor that’s able to dissipate heat better than the Tesla's Model S. That allows the Taycan to make its 2.6 second run to 60MPH not just once or twice but over and over again until the battery is practically drained. This aligns with Porsches’ reputation of durability.

For Porsche, this step into electrification is a risky one. An electric Porsche needs to uphold the brand’s principles of performance and engagement. Click play to learn more.

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Click here to watch the another episode of APEX:60 about the incredible SR-71 "Blackbird". 

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